About us

Our Philosphy

There is all too often a false dichotomy between the aesthete and the investor, or the environmentalist and the entrepreneur. But it does not have to be so.

Art does not have to be for money, but an artist will struggle to live without a paying audience. And business does not have to be for a good cause, but any decent business-person should strive to fund what is worthy, not just what is profitable.

Ethical Investing dates back to at leat the 1700’s when the Quaker’s in England found neither investing in slavery, nor selling its produce, to be compatible with their religious belief that we are all equal. While those views seemed, at the time, to be radical, it is now near universally accepted that the Quaker’s were right. Their ethical investing has now become law: worldwide those who would seek to profit from slavery run the risk of severe punishment. And rightly so.

Today, the contention of many capitalists is that they must invest in firearms, coal, tobacco and all manner of harmful activities in order to drive investment returns. Greed often motivates these people just as, when they invest in art, they often do so for social status rather than the love of it.

A Rich Life stands in opposition to this profanity. We celebrate profit where it causes no major harm (and preferably when it benefits stakeholders). We celebrate art for what it can gift all of us, rich and poor, and we celebrate literature for the knowledge it can give us, as well as the pleasure.

The aesthete need not eschew wealth, and indeed we would prefer see wealth accumulate in the hands of those who care about beauty, not the crass.

And the environmentalist need not eschew profit. Indeed, we would prefer see capital (and the power it brings) accumulate in the hands of those who would act rapidly to reduce the environmental strain our pollution is causing.

Meet The Team

Claude Walker

Claude Walker

Claude is the founder of A Rich Life and writes the Ethical Equities column for this publication.

He had the good fortune of starting young as an investor, and was the Research Analyst and then Advisor of Motley Fool Hidden Gems from 2014 – 2018, during which period his recommendations more than doubled the market return. He has a go-anywhere, do-anything approach to investing, but he always considers the impact his investments have on society and the environment, not just the expected financial return.

In the past few years he has enjoyed most success with medium-sized high-growth tech stocks on the ASX, but has continued to invest heavily in smaller, unloved and ignored micro-caps, because the market is much less efficient at the small end.

Fabregasto

Fabregasto

Fabregasto is a growth-oriented private investor with a particular fondness for software stocks and companies below $1B market cap, and is always hunting for long term compounders (aren’t we all?!). His treatises on ASX growth stocks have attracted a broad international readership from retail investors to analysts at large financial institutions.

Matt Brazier

Matt Brazier

Originally from the UK, Matt is passionate about investing. Prior to becoming a full-time investor, he completed a master’s degree in mathematics and qualified as a Chartered Global Management Accountant. Matt generated an internal rate of return of more than 30% on his personal ASX account from when he bought his first ever stock in 2012 until its close in 2019. He used the proceeds to set up a small private investment company focused on Australian equities which he runs today. Since 2016, he has also been managing portfolios of UK listed shares on behalf of family. When not researching investment ideas, Matt loves spending time with his young family, reading and being outdoors.
Kenny Pittock

Kenny Pittock

Kenny Pittock is a Melbourne based artist who uses humour and sentimentality to playfully respond to contemporary Australian culture, having fun with the overlaps and boundaries between the public and the personal. Kenny received an Honours Fine Arts Degree in painting from the Victorian College of the Arts in 2013, since then he has had solo exhibitions in Italy and Singapore, as well as consistently exhibited his work all over Australia with galleries including ACCA in Melbourne, PICA in Perth, Artspace in Sydney and MONA in Tasmania.